Tag Archives: WEIGHT LOSS

PREVENT INJURIES IN YOUR YOGA PRACTICE

Common-Yoga-Injuries-and-How-to-Avoid-Them_BAG_featuredThe eastern philosophy of “be happy ,in whatever you have”has long been taken over by the western mind set to “always want more”.And this can be seen in our yoga practice too,many people unfortunately are lured to yoga by popular studios across the country as a quick fix alternate to lose wight,look good and feel toned.

A friend of mine recently joined a yoga studio after reading its advertisement for weight loss.The very first day of her yoga class and she was made to 54 rounds of surya namaskars and close to 12 asanas holding each asana for about 3 mins.

After the class all excited,she called me up,saying how lovely the class was,how much she sweated and how light she felt.

After a week or so I got an sos call from her,asking if I knew any orthopaediatrician cause her lower back is hurting a lot.

And unfortunately this is not one stray incident,but this happens all the time to most of us if we continue to do yoga without the knowledge of our own body,the alignment principles and certain safety measures to be adopted during our yoga practice.

 

Pain in the Asana — The Need-to-Know

While most yoga injuries aren’t severe and go unreported, more serious issues do occur, including strains and sprains, fractures, dislocations, and, in rare cases, bone spurs, sciatic nerve damage,back pain etc. But according to yoga experts, injuries can happen any time, in any sport, or even walking down the sidewalk — and scary injuries are rare. Most yoga injuries develop gradually over years of consistent over-stretching and misalignment. As with any physical activity, the safest approach to yoga is

• Yoga includes a sophisticated set of practices that ought to be practiced under the supervision of a competent teacher. Attempting yoga postures on your own could result in improper technique ensuing into injuries. Make certain to search out a qualified teacher before you start practicing

• Developing student physical awareness: Many students (especial beginners) are typically unaware of their physical limits and range of motion. To prevent injuries, make sure the beginners’ are smaller in order to able to keep an in-depth eye on all students.

• Avoid overexerting yourself. Remember, yoga is some thing that you will learn and develop over an extended amount of your time. Enable enough time for the body to develop the desired flexibility and strength before attempting advanced yoga postures.

• Continuously bear in mind to warm up before your yoga session. Never skip a warm up session. Warming up is of utmost importance because it is an injury prevention program for the body.

• Use props – Props are very important in preventing injuries. The unfortunate issue is that several students do not use them. You ought to additionally make sure that you utilize the props yourself. Once you try this, your students will presumably feel comfortable once they use them and this reduces the probabilities of students injuring themselves. When teaching, you ought not label entirely different poses as basic, intermediate, or advanced. Once you label poses, you are sure to have several injuries. Massive numbers of student are aiming at reaching the advanced levels quickly, which can create a mindset of competitiveness and result in injuries. As a tutor, you ought to clearly justify the importance of precaution and do not expect your students to discard their egos no matter how many times you tell them that yoga is not a contest.

COMMON AREAS OF INJURY AND THE PREVENTIVE STEPS TO BE TAKEN

  • Wrists: When it comes to the wrists, it’s all about leverage. Placing all of the body’s weight in the wrists when the hands are on the mat can lead to muscle and joint injuries.
    Find relief: When in doubt, spread ‘em. In any pose where weight is placed on the hands (such as down dog), distribute the body’s weight through both hands by spreading them wide and pressing through the fingers. In down dog, push the hips back to decrease the angle of the wrists to the floor. In arm balances, such as crow pose, look to see that the elbows are stacked directly over the wrist.

Elbows: Joint pain in the elbows can result from bending them out to the sides in poses likechaturanga. While it may be easier to execute, lowering down with outward-pointing elbows can stress the joint and can also put undue stresses on the wrists.

  • Tuck and lower: When bending the elbows in a pose (particularly plank or chaturanga), keep the elbows tucked alongside the ribs as you bend them, and make sure the elbows’ creases face forward. If this is difficult (yes, it’s a serious test of triceps strength!), begin with the knees on the floor. Remember, you can always work up to the unmodified version through regular practice.

Shoulders: Beware the shrug. By raising the shoulders up toward the ears (like when moving intoup dog), yogis stop using the supporting muscles in the arms, shoulders, and neck. Shrugging also compresses the shoulders, which can cause muscle injuries. Even worse: It’s easy to injure the shoulder girdle or rotator cuff (and even dislocate the joint) by over-extending or over-stretching.

  • Let go: Be careful not to pull too hard on the shoulders in stretches, and always keep the shoulders held back and down away from the ears.

Ribs: Twists are awesome for releasing tension, but if done improperly they can overextend or bruise the intercostal muscles (the muscles in between the ribs).

  • Twist, don’t shout: Lengthen upwards through the spine before twisting. Imagine that someone has a string attached to the crown of your head and is very gently pulling you up toward the ceiling. Twist to the point of feeling a stretch but not past it, even if you’re flexible

.Lower back: Lower back pain is the most frequently cited yoga injury, and teachers speculate that it’s likely the result of rounding through the spine in poses like forward folds and down dog. Rounding causes the spine to flex the opposite way that it’s supposed to, which can cause disc problems in addition to that achy feeling post-class.

  • Soothe the spine: Before bending, imagine lengthening the spine up and away from the hips to avoid rounding. Still struggling to stay on the straight and narrow? Try bending the knees in poses like forward folds and down dog,  since the culprit could be tight hamstrings. During seated forward folds, try sitting on a blanket or block to take pressure off the lower back.

Hamstrings: Spend most days sitting in front of the computer, in class, or in the car? Guilty as charged. As a result, many of us have tight hamstrings, so it’s easy to pull or over-stretch them in poses like forward bends.

  • Hamper pain: Down dog and lunges are great ways to stretch the hamstrings (just remember to go slowly and work at your own pace). If you have any kind of hamstring injury, try laying off poses that extend through the back of the body and legs until the injury heals.

Hips: It’s easy to over-extend the hips’ range of motion in splitswarrior poses, and wide-legged forward folds,  which might tear the muscles of the inner groin or inner thighs.

  • Get hip (to proper form): A good rule of thumb is to make sure that the toes are pointed forward in any pose where the hips are squared off in the same direction (think: warrior I). Imagine there are headlights attached to the front of the hips and that you’re trying to keep the area straight ahead of you illuminated at all times.Also if hips are tight ,try to elevate the hips by sitting on a block or blanket.This will help to keep the back straight without causing too much strain on the lower back.

KneeKnee issues can plague even experienced yogis . A common culprit of pain is the cross-legged position. Flexibility carries from the hips first; if the hips are tight in the pose, the knees will be the first place to feel pain or tension.

  • Prevent the pain: For those regularly bothered by knee pain, avoid sitting in cross-legged position or full lotus for long periods unless the hips are already very flexible. Placing a block or rolled-up blanket under the knees in cross-legged positions can also help reduce strain. Any time the knee is bent in a standing pose (such as warriors I and II), look to see that there’s a vertical line from the bent knee to the heel — this ensures that the body is bearing weight properly.

NeckHead and shoulder stands can be the worst culprits for neck pain and injury. Repeatedly and incorrectly placing pressure on the neck in poses such as shoulder stand and headstand can compress the neck and put pressure on the cervical vertebrae, resulting in joint issues and, in some cases, loss of neck flexion.

  • Prop it up: Have chronic neck or shoulder issues? It might be best to avoid full inversions all together (or attempt them only with close supervision and using props that elevate the neck away from the floor). For those who already practice the pose without props, make sure the shoulder blades are drawn down and back so they’re safely supporting the body. Most importantly, never jerk the head once you’re up in the pose, because it can destabilize the body, possibly causing a fall.

597979-1331-11Turn “Ouch!” into Ommm — Your Action Plan

Proper alignment in poses is key, but it’s not the only factor in a safe yoga practice. To stay blissed out instead of stressed out over injury, follow the basic guidelines below.

  • Leave ego outside. It can be tempting to rush into more advanced poses (how tough can handstands be, right?), but pushing our bodies before they’re ready is a recipe for injury. Yoga is “about finding where you are, “not trying to push to a place where your body may never be able to go.”
  • Warm up. It’s an important part of any physical activity, and yoga is no exception. Basic stretches (like neck and shoulder rolls and gentle twists) help prepare the body for more challenging poses later on in a sequence. And remember to give the mind a chance to warm up to the practice: Take a few breaths to get centered at the beginning of class, or establish a pre-flow ritual (such as chanting some Oms) to get grounded.
  • Ease in. No one would expect to run a marathon the first time they lace up their sneakers. Don’t expect to do a headstand or even get the heels to the floor in down dog the first time you hit the mat. Instead, opt for beginner-friendly classes that will develop the foundation for more advanced moves.
  • Communicate. Get to know the teacher and be sure to share any pre-existing issues that might require modifications in certain poses.If you don’t know how to modify or use props, ask. And if a pose just isn’t working, don’t be embarrassed to simply… not do it. Instead, focus on the poses that provide benefit and release.
  • Come out of postures slowly. This is particularly important if you’ve been holding a certain pose for several minutes. A good rule of thumb is to work out of a pose as gradually as you moved into it.
  • Use props and modifications. There’s no shame in not being ready to hold a pose completelyon your own. If there’s tightness somewhere in the body, other parts of the body will have to accommodate it — which is why it’s so important not to push the body past what it’s able to do on a given day.  Props and modifications allow the body to get a feel for a pose and gradually work up to its full variation without injury.
  • Never lock your joints. Hyper-extension (locking) is a sure-fire way to wear out joints and cause injury down the road. Focus on engaging the muscles around the joints to gain stability .
  • If you do get injured, take care. If you tweak, pull, or tear something during a yoga flow, don’t be afraid to step out of class early. Care for it like any other sports injury, and seek a professional’s opinion if the pain persists.
  • Stay for savasana. It’s easy to head for the door as soon as the instructor calls for savasana (the final resting pose of a yoga flow), but sticking around is good for your health. Savasana allows the body’s nervous system to slow down and brings closure to the practice. Even just two or three minutes can have an effect.
  • Above all: listen to your body. At all stages of yoga practice, stay mindful. Really listen to your body so you can be sensitive to any tightness or strain. Just because you did a particular pose one day, doesn’t mean your body will be able to do it the next. “In our yoga practice, “we are building a relationship with our bodies the same way we build them with other people: by listening.”

 

To sum it up,your yoga practice whether its hatha,power,vinyasa or ashtanga or any other style should be holistic,should be under guidance of trained and experienced instructor and above all should be mindfull where you learn to know and respect your own body.

 

-PRATIBHA AGARWAL

DIRECTOR AND INSTRUCTOR

ANAHATA YOGA ZONE

 

 

References:

Understanding and Preventing Yoga Injuries

International Journal of Yoga

 

ARE MEN INTIMIDATED BY YOGA………..?

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Where are all the male yogis?

Yogasana is a practice that was designed by men, originally intended for men. But the undeniable absence of men in the yoga classes makes you wonder….. Why is it that in this new age, men share no interest in taking part in this amazing practice? Is it because, they identify emotions like aggression and competition with physical activity? Or is it because they simply haven’t understood the holistic nature of yoga practices? Are they not aware that these lessons stretch far beyond a body position — they transcend into life. Yoga has seven additional limbs, with asana as only one — the most popular. Are they not aware of the fact, some of the best athletes of today incorporate yoga into their everyday lives? Many celebrity men, not only from India but all over the world are following the path of yoga.

There have been many misrepresentations of yoga, especially now that it has been commercialized; many skinny women are seen advertising yoga. May be that is why, yoga is perceived to be a gentle form of physical activity for feminine, delicate bodies. These misconceptions are very common amongst those who don’t fully understand the practice.

For all men out here, let’s be clear… yoga does not make you dainty or feminine. It makes you strong and durable. It provides you with a constant challenge to become a better form of yourself, day in and day out. It teaches you how to find comfort and contentment in some of the most uncomfortable situations.

Is it not funny, when guys say, ‘I don’t think I should do yoga because I’m not flexible’? It’s like saying, ‘I’m too weak, so I can’t lift weights.’ Actually if one is not flexible, that’s the precise reason one should be stretching on the yoga mat.

Majority of the men, are naturally tight. Though boys and girls may be born equally flexible, by adolescence, boys generally lose flexibility faster than girls, and as boys become men, the differences in flexibility tend to grow. Researchers have noted this gap, although they can’t specifically link it to differences in hormones, musculature, or connective tissue. Whatever is to blame, the typical man’s pursuits and lifestyle, does not help them to retain the original flexibility.

While increasing your range of motion and flexibility, yoga postures enhance the aesthetic of the physique. It even enables you to lift heavier weight. Additionally, most yoga poses are held for longer durations than traditional exercises. This causes your muscles to have an isometric contraction which increases overall muscular endurance.

Lifting weights shortens muscle fibers, leading to reduced flexibility. Asanas like plank, cobra, up-dog and most inversions, help in building great scapular durability, which is a prerequisite for upper body strength training. Exercises like bench press, pull ups and seated row all depend on the serratus anterior, trapezius muscles, etc. in order to perform these exercises.

Most yoga classes begin with a reminder to honor your body’s particular needs and limits on that particular day. This basic ability to scan and assess yourself as you practice will help reduce the incidence of injury when running or playing other sports. Plus, flexible, well-stretched yoga muscles will heal and recover more quickly after working out or getting strained.

Men often suffer from tightness particularly in the hips, hamstrings, and shoulders that can lead to injury or weakness. Over-training in any one sport can cause repetitive stress and other more serious injuries.

Yoga is a full-body workout that creates both strength and flexibility. You need to have both. One without the other is a recipe for disaster. The yoga session for men should include the practices which stretch out guys’ tightest spots (like the shoulders, hips, and groin) and strengthen muscles that get no love during workouts (like the low back and knees).

Forward Bend : Padhastasana
Stretches hamstrings, calves, and hips; strengthens legs and knees
What’s good about it ? This is a great move to use as part of a warm-up for any workout.
Sometimes it’s difficult to know that buildup of tension in head, neck and shoulders, and can create headaches, insomnia, poor circulation and decreased lung capacity. If you practice slow, steady breathing along with this pose, it can lower your blood pressure over time.

Downward-Facing Dog : Adhomukh shwanasana
Stretches feet, shoulders, hamstrings, and calves; strengthens arms, legs, and core
What’s good about it? Men often experience back pain due to chronic tightness in the hamstrings and hips. It’s also common for them to have very tight shoulders. Down Dog releases those areas, while building upper body strength. If you can do only one pose a day, start with Downward Dog.

Chair : Utkatasana 

Stretches shoulders and chest; strengthens thighs, calves, spine, and ankles
What’s good about it?  No gym necessary! Chair pose torches abdominal fat while strengthening the thighs and legs.

Crescent Lunge : Anjaneyasana

Loosens tight hips by stretching the groin; strengthens arms and legs
What’s good about it? Tight hips can cause lower back pain, knee strain, and injury, which can keep you out of the game, out of the gym, and in pain at your desk. Add Crescent Lunge to your pre-workout routine to open the hips

 

Warrior I : Veerbhadrasana I
Stretches shoulders and hips; strengthens upper and lower body
What’s good about it? Warrior increases space and mobility in areas where men need it most—shoulders, hips, and knees. It’s another pose that generates great stability in and around the knee, so increases stability for high-impact workouts.

Bridge pose : Setubandhasana
Stretches chest, neck, spine, and hips
What’s good about it? Many men are tight in the intercostals muscles and connective tissue surrounding the rib cage, which can limit lung capacity. Bridge pose opens the chest and releases those tight muscles, allowing for fuller, easier breaths. Over time, practicing this pose can improve performance in all physical activities and is helpful for relieving upper respiratory issues.

Bow Pose : Dhanurasana
Stretches hips, shoulders, and thighs; strengthens back

What’s good about it? One of the best stress-busting poses, Bow opens the chest to allow you to take in more oxygen. Strong abs are great, but can lead to injury if you don’t strengthen the back, too. Bow pose takes care of this, reducing your risk of injury due to muscular imbalance.

 

Boat Pose : Naukasana
Strengthens abs, spine, arms and hip flexors

What’s good about it? In addition to strengthening the core and back muscles, Boat promotes healthy prostate gland function.

Hero Pose : Virasana
Stretches knees, ankles and thighs

What’s good about it? Hero pose stabilizes and strengthens the vulnerable knee joints while lubricating the connective tissues in and around the knee with blood, oxygen, and fluid, making it an essential pose for runners.

Reclining Big Toe : Supta Padangusthasana
Stretches hips, thighs, hamstrings, groins, and calves; strengthens the knees

What’s good about it? This pose stimulates the prostate gland and improves digestion. Runners may find it useful for relieving sciatica caused by a tight piriformis.

Bringing yoagsana practice in the routine will make a man realize that the mat offers him a place to calm his nerves and breathe deeply. He returns to the office rejuvenated and relaxed, ready to work with a purpose.

Although the primary mission of yoga is balance (in both body and mind), it seriously challenges your strength and flexibility. There are a fair share of poses that put people—particularly men—to the test. Advanced yoga positions that every guy should strive to achieve are Chakrasana, Shirshasana, Sarvangasana and Halasana.

Even though yoga practices are safe (if done under able guidance), men also have to be more mindful about injuries. As some yoga teachers observe, men also are more likely to push into a position rather than relax into it or avoid it completely. As with anything, the baby-step approach helps. Developing your practice from simple to advance postures, understanding the ways to approach a posture and the non-competitive attitude helps!

MEDITATION:

Meditation—the ability to quiet your mind—is probably the biggest challenge! The ability to obtain focus and clarity is a tremendous advantage for everyone. The practice can also teach a guy who’s overwhelmed by his many responsibilities that the best way to get things done is by being present—focusing on one thing at a time. Meditation has vast benefits from improving your mental focus, clarity, lowering stress levels, to kick starting your immune system. Practice every day to settle the mind.

The countless benefits of yoga extend far beyond gender. Open up to possibility and indulge in opportunity. Be well!

 

BY SUJATA NERURKAR

 

DETOX WITH YOGA

DETOX WITH THESE VERY SIMPLE YOGA ASANAS!!

 

Do you want to start your new year with a clean slate?

People love to start each New Year with something new. If you are looking to kick off 2014 on a healthy, fresh, positive note, try yoga. Yoga helps you to remain in the present, moving forward, never looking back.

The right yoga routine can also help you detox your body and mind.

 

How detoxification works

There are three main systems of the body that play a crucial role in the elimination of wastes —

  1. Circulatory system: pumps blood throughout the body, delivering oxygen to and carrying waste products away from cells.
  2. Digestive system: processes the food we eat, separating nutrients from waste and eliminating anything the body doesn’t need.
  3. Lymphatic system: collects intracellular fluid from throughout the body and transports it to the lymph nodes where anything harmful (such as bacteria or other contaminants) can be removed before the lymphatic fluid is returned to the bloodstream.

It’s a robust system that works well on its own. But to cope with the heavy demands, thanks to the modern lifestyle (increased stress levels, poor diet, increased pollution etc.) we need something else to be part of our lifestyle. Most forms of vigorous exercise stimulate all three systems of elimination to some extent, thereby helping the body in its quest to cleanse and detox. But yoga’s inside out approach gives it an extra edge.

How yoga facilitates detoxification

  • Focus on systematically stretching and compressing every part of the body, is particularly well-suited to keeping the waste-removal departments of the body functioning well. This facilitates the removal of waste products such as carbon dioxide, lactic acid and lymphatic fluid from the deep tissues and extremities of the body that other forms of exercise just don’t reach.
  • Yogic breathing also plays an important role in promoting detoxification. Sitting with poor posture obstructs the lungs from inflating fully, and our chronic state of low-grade stress often leads to a clenched diaphragm. As a result, we don’t take in as much life-sustaining oxygen when we inhale, or expel as much of the potentially hazardous carbon dioxide when we exhale.
  • Yogic breathing helps clear out carbon dioxide from the lung tissue, stimulates the organs of digestion and can, over time, retrain the diaphragm to move freely. And when the diaphragm moves with its natural fluidity, the abdominal organs are massaged and the lungs are fully emptied with every breath — not just the ones you take on the yoga mat.

Clear mind, clear body

In addition to its physical benefits, yoga aids in mental detox as well.

  • Slowing Down: Reducing stress and mental over-activity is perhaps the most important element of a successful detox plan. Habitual rushing, multitasking, and dealing with information overloads are the main reasons of toxicity. And like an overtaxed liver, an overtaxed mind and nervous system can lead to a host of health issues, including adrenal fatigue, insomnia, irregular menstrual cycles, indigestion, and unwelcome weight gain.
  • Inward focus of  Yoga practice teaches us how to say “no” to the outside influences that pull your attention and energy in so many directions—and replacing them with healthier choices—you’ll begin to tune in to your body’s natural rhythms and detox more effectively.
  • Heightened awareness of a yoga practitioner helps purge toxic thoughts by teaching you to move your awareness away from the chaos of the mind and back to the present moment.

Yoga poses to detoxify the body

Specific yoga pose/practices can help expedite the detoxification process. The heating and twisting sequence designed for this plan can help move toxins from your tissues through your lymphatic and digestive systems so that they can be eliminated from the body.

 

Kapalbhati

Easily the best practice to cleanse your lungs off the residual carbon dioxide. This could also be your start up practices as it exercises abdomen muscles and massages inner organs.

 

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Twisting postures : Squeeze the abdominal organs and stimulates digestion and elimination.

  • Marichiyasana 3 (Marichi’s Twist)  :

Sit up tall with your legs straight. Bend your right knee and bring the sole of your right foot to the floor just in front of your right sitting bone. Rest your right hand on the floor behind your back for support.

Reach your left hand up so strongly that your ribcage lifts up. Rotate your torso to the right and bring your left elbow to the outside of your right knee. Stay for 5 deep breaths, gradually and gently using the sensation of your left elbow pressing into to your right leg to encourage your torso to twist further to the right.

Either look behind you, over your right shoulder or straight ahead, depending on what feels best to your neck. Repeat on the other side.

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  • Supine Twist:

Lie on the ground, hug right knee into chest, “T” arms out to either side, and allow right knee to fall to the left.

You can stay with a neutral neck or, if it feels good, look to the right.

You can also take left hand to right thigh to allow its weight to ground right leg.

Stay here for at least 5 deep breaths, then repeat on the other side.

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Downward Dog

Getting the heart higher than the head reverses the pull of gravity and aids in the circulation of blood and lymph. Also gently tones the abdomen, which stimulates digestion.

Start on your hands and knees with the entire surface of your palms pressing into the floor and your toes tucked under. Slowly lift the knees and straighten the legs. Press equally into the hands and feet and lift your sitting bones up as you move the thighs back. Allow the head to hang. Stay for 5–10 deep breaths.

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Legs Up the Wall

Bathes the abdomen in fresh blood and stimulates the digestive organs. Soothes the nervous system.

Sit in front of a wall with your right hip and shoulder touching the wall. Bend your knees and roll onto your left side, so your feet and seat are touching the wall. Roll onto your back and extend your legs so that they rest on the wall. Either rest your hands on your belly or let your arms lie on the floor, palms up. Stay for at least 10 deep breaths.

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Do these poses in order any time you feel like you need a cleansing. As you do these moves, use each inhale to lengthen and each exhale to wring yourself out like a sponge, getting rid of anything you no longer want or need. One must practice on an empty stomach.

 

By-SUJATA NERURKAR